1. Finding Rails migrations

    Scrabble pieces arranged to spell S-E-A-R-C-H signifying the search for Rails migrations across branches.

    Sometimes, I find myself working across several branches helping different teammates with their stories. Often, these branches use Rails migrations to easily manage the database changes that need to be made to support the work. This means that I end up running migrations from many different branches. Because I am human, I often forget to roll those migrations back before switching branches. When a destructive migration has to happen as part of a branch, it leaves me in a situation where I have several migrations that I need to roll back at any given time. In addition, they might be interleaved with migrations that exist on the master branch if it’s a longer-running branch.

  2. RailsConf 2018: What’s in a price? How to price your products and services

    So you have something new to sell: maybe your first book or a hip new SaaS. How do you decide the price? How do you know you’re not overpricing? Or underpricing? Why, oh why, did you ever think to sell something?!

    Instead of choosing a number by looking inward at your costs, you can use what programmers use best: an abstraction! You’ll learn a model for picking the right price for your product and what that price communicates so you can confidently price your next great invention. You’ll leave with an actionable list of next steps for pricing your future projects.

  3. Four things to consider when using Redis in production

    Ruby programmers rely on Redis as a high-performance key-value store for many different jobs. Redis is suitable for many different tasks, including caching, acting as the transport medium for a message bus, and service analytics. Redis is often one of the first external dependencies you reach for as a Ruby programmer because it forms the backbone of the Resque and Sidekiq asynchronous job systems.

    When you’re starting a new project, it is tempting to set up the bare minimum configuration for Redis because it works well out of the box. However, once you’ve started to put some load on the system, there are several concerns that you should be aware of when using Redis. In this post, I’ll talk about some of these concerns and some high-level ways of addressing them.

    The four main concerns I will discuss in this post are monitoring, security, high availability and redundancy, and horizontal scalability. This is the first in a series of posts where I will cover these intermediate-to-advanced topics in depth.

  4. Creating a subset font

    Using custom font faces on a web page introduces several potential issues. Most commonly, these issues manifest in one of two types of problem: the dreaded “flash of unstyled text” (FOUT) or “flash of invisible text” (FOIT); or poor initial render time due to font faces specified in blocking calls to outside services. By placing only a subset font in the critical render path, you can reduce the amount of FOUT/FOIT and speed up the initial render performance.

    However, the creation of the a subset font is not described anywhere that I found. This post discusses how I went about creating a subset font, the tools I used, and some thoughts on what exactly you should subset in your font.