1. A checklist for reviewing Rails database migrations

    A joking todo-list for the day saying: 1. Wake up, 2. Coffee, 3. The rest

    Software teams often cite code reviews as a primary means for ensuring quality and reducing bugs in their code. However, without high quality reviews, the efficacy of this practice is questionable. In most places that I’ve worked, a change requires only one code review (either through necessity due to team size or through informal norms). When this is the case, the code review becomes a taxing process where, if you’re not on your game, bugs or maintainability issues can start to leak into production. This means that it often falls to the senior engineers to do code reviews. However, relying entirely on the seniors means that they become a bottleneck in the process. When it comes to “dangerous” changes like Rails database migrations, the bottleneck of relying on a small subset of the team can mean that velocity drops. Or, to keep up velocity, you make code reviews less stringent and quality drops.

    In try to “scale myself” for my team, I have started to experiment with checklists for performing code reviews. The first one that I wrote up is a checklist for reviewing Rails database migrations. We run on Heroku, which means that zero-downtime migrations are easy to do, as long as you write your migrations correctly. I intend this checklist to help more junior teammates do as thorough of a job in reviewing as I do. Going forward, I want to make more checklists for doing different types of code reviews, to further scale myself for my team.

  2. Grouped pagination in ActiveRecord

    Sometimes, designers will mock-up an extremely usable page that they’ve thought about and tested. Once they’re done and they bring it to you to implement, you look at it and think, “how on Earth can I do that efficiently?” One such case happened at work recently.

    We were working on a “command center” of sorts where we show our customers a list of upgrades in various states. The design called for what looked like three different lists of records with each table consisting of records in a state. Since a customer can have potentially dozens of these records, we knew we wanted to paginate the page. The wrinkle in setup was that the pagination should consider the full list of records as the dataset, not each list individually. This caused us to wonder how we can efficiently implement grouped pagination in ActiveRecord.

  3. Finding Rails migrations

    Scrabble pieces arranged to spell S-E-A-R-C-H signifying the search for Rails migrations across branches.

    Sometimes, I find myself working across several branches helping different teammates with their stories. Often, these branches use Rails migrations to easily manage the database changes that need to be made to support the work. This means that I end up running migrations from many different branches. Because I am human, I often forget to roll those migrations back before switching branches. When a destructive migration has to happen as part of a branch, it leaves me in a situation where I have several migrations that I need to roll back at any given time. In addition, they might be interleaved with migrations that exist on the master branch if it’s a longer-running branch.